jibrankhan

Jibran Khan Khan desde San Michele AG, Italia desde San Michele AG, Italia

Lector Jibran Khan Khan desde San Michele AG, Italia

Jibran Khan Khan desde San Michele AG, Italia

jibrankhan

el simbolismo es pesado, y odié el libro.

jibrankhan

Why did I keep reading Oprah's book club selections? I clearly didn't enjoy them very much.

jibrankhan

One of my favorite books. Words cannot describe the endless ugliness I felt after finishing the last page in a dining hall in college. At the time I felt very much like the titular Collector, and it sickened me. I find this to be a very complex book, more than it is probably credited to being. Having (more or less) recently read The Woman in the Dunes, I find them similar in many ways, and if I was wasting away my life now in college I would probably write a report comparing the two. One thing that gripes me about the book is when Fowles talks about the Collector, I remember him talking about it in particularly English class terms. That is within the scope of the book, but if it were only that this book would not interest me so much. What interests me about this book is its describing of unrequited love (which when usually portrayed in other books does not strike me as accurate as it is portrayed in this book) and the tendency some have of trying to keep something we admire detached and away from ourselves, yet also very close so as to stifle it; so it is locked up so that it may not change, and undergoes a grotesque but natural transformation. That was a goofy sentence, but there's nothing more tragic and disturbing in my mind. Think of a butterfly kept in a glass jar. I remember feeling a little unsatisfied with the section narrated by the woman. The movie version staring General Zod is good, very subtle and boring in that particular British way, like a play. I have watched it a couple times and each time I watch it I find the Collector less and less of a sympathetic character.